These are powerful typesetting programs, and thus come with their own special difficulties for creating PDFs that ProQuest can publish. Being open-source programs, official documentation is sometime scant. There are large communities for them, however, such as http://tex.stackexchange.com/, where users ask and answer technical questions.

There are a few areas of concern:
  1. Fonts must be embedded.  Here is some general advice about embedding fonts using LaTex: https://www.karlrupp.net/2016/01/embed-all-fonts-in-pdfs-latex-pdflatex/
  2. Type 3 fonts should be avoided.  One especially problematic font issue related to the use of TeX and LaTex is the use of Type 3 fonts. TeX and LaTeX use Type 3 fonts by default. Type 3 fonts do not render well onscreen and can cause problems at the printer. Here is some advice about replacing Type 3 fonts with Type 1 fonts: http://dsanta.users.ch/resources/type1.html.
  1. For ideas about packages that don’t use type 3 fonts, this page might be helpful:  https://tex.stackexchange.com/questions/4922/why-do-some-fonts-used-by-siunitx-and-textcomp-look-rasterized
  2. Sometimes, only specialized fonts…mathematical symbols and such…are rendered as Type 3 fonts.  Here is a list of fonts that include mathematical symbols rendered as Type 1 fonts: http://www.tex.ac.uk/FAQ-psfchoice.html
  3. Sometimes, only the figures embedded in the document have type 3 fonts.  If you are using matplotlib to create figures, this link will help:  http://phyletica.org/matplotlib-fonts/  An alternative solution would be to rasterize the figures, so that the text is a part of the image.
  4. You can verify that there are no Type 3 fonts in your document by using Adobe Acrobat Reader (available for free at https://get.adobe.com/reader/).
  1. Open your PDF in Adobe Acrobat Reader
  2. Go to File-->Properties-->Fonts.
  3. The program will list all the fonts that you’ve used in your document, along with information about whether the fonts are Type 1, TrueType, or Type 3 fonts.  In this example, we see a Type 1 font, followed by a couple of Type 3 fonts.
 
User-added image 
 
  1. Finally, it is possible to create graphs that are so complicated that they don’t render very well online, and often cannot be printed.  Sometimes, we see a graph with hundreds or thousands of data points, many on top of each other.  In this instance, those graphics should be rasterized.  Here is a link that may be helpful in that regard: https://tex.stackexchange.com/questions/85812/pdf-images-slow-scrolling